Battle of bogside

This group stated their aim as firstly to keep the peace, but if this failed, to organise the defence of the Bogside. Subsequent history[ edit ] Today the Bogside has experienced much change. The terror in all nationalist minds was that the entirely sectarian and armed B-Specials, mobilised that evening, would swamp the Bogside and be happy to use live rounds.

Witnesses stated Nash was unarmed. While the DCDA had failed to provide stewards on August 12, it had organised for the erection of barricades and a large supply of petrol bombs. The paratroopers, on foot and in armoured vehicles, chased people down Rossville Street and into the Bogside.

RUC officers square off against protestors in August As additional RUC units arrived Bogside locals, fearing police baton charges, erected barricades using old furniture, wire and other scavenged materials. However, these incidents proved to be the start of an escalating pattern of civil unrest, that culminated in the events of August During the clashes in Dungiven, Catholic civilian Francis McCloskey 67 was beaten with batons by police officers and died of his injuries the following day.

Both the Official and Provisional IRA openly patrolled the area and local residents often paid subscriptions to both. Their route took them dangerously close to the Bogside, a Catholic stronghold. While the British Army was non-sectarian and largely apolitical, its mission was to assist the Northern Ireland government in restoring order — not to protect Catholics from the police or the government.

Belfast Child

On entering the Bogside both the RUC and the Loyalists were pelted with stones, projectiles and Molotov cocktails homemade firebombs and quickly driven back. The RUC was inadequately equipped to cope with the escalating violence.

Part of their route would take them along the western wall of the city directly overlooking the Catholic Bogside. The British were warmly welcomed at first: The soldiers opened fire, killing one civilian and wounding six others.

British troops entered Derry on August 14th and Belfast the following day. The march made its way along William Street but, as it neared the city centre, its path was blocked by British Army barriers. However, this time things were different. In anticipation of a confrontation taking place, local republicans decided to form the Derry Citizens Defence Association DCDA with the intention of maintaining peace and defending the Catholic areas of the city, particularly the Bogside which was the usual target of the RUC.

There were people at the barricade and some were throwing stones at the soldiers, but none were near enough to hit them. A volunteer group of paramedics, the Knights of Malta, attended to those suffering the effects of gas and others hurt by missiles and mismanaged petrol bombs.

It was recovered by unionists, however, following re-drawing of electoral boundaries by the unionist government in the Northern Ireland Parliament. The police were reinforced by B specials.

On 13 August, Jack LynchTaoiseach of the Republic of Irelandmade a televised speech about the events in Derry, in which he said that he "could not stand by and watch innocent people injured and perhaps worse.

Most of those who were killed or lost their houses were Catholic. Lynch condemned the RUC as partisan and dangerous and called for intervention by the United Nations; he also ordered ambulances to be stationed along the border with Northern Ireland.

The clashes began about 2. Rioting and violence were particularly severe in Belfast. The inevitable did happen when loyalists and nationalist youths exchanged insults and then stones at Waterloo Place. Initially, the police attempted to keep separate the two hostile crowds which gathered at opposite ends of this street.

The Londonderry County Boroughwhich covered the city, had been won by nationalists in Inthe Official IRA declared an end to their armed campaign, and with volunteers on the ground already mad about the ceasefire in midthat crossed the line to hardliners.

As a consequence of what happened in Derry, serious disturbances broke out in many other places, in particular Belfast, leading to burning of houses, expulsion of populations, many hundreds injured and eight deaths.

The Bogside is a neighbourhood outside the city walls of Derry, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland.

On this Day in 1969: Battle of the Bogside

The large gable-wall murals by the Bogside Artists, Free Derry Corner and the Gasyard Féile (an annual music and arts festival held in a former gasyard) are popular tourist attractions. The Battle of the Bogside.

Battle of the Bogside

Image copyright Ireland Calling The Battle of the Bogside was one of the first major confrontations of the Troubles and changed Northern Ireland forever.

The Battle of the Bogside was a very large communal riot that took place from 12 to 14 August in Derry, Northern Ireland. The fighting was between residents of the Bogside area (organised under the Derry Citizens' Defence Association), and the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) along with local unionists.

Jan 29,  · Posts about Battle of Bogside written by belfastchildis. The Battle of the Bogside was a very large communal riot that took place from 12 to 14 August in Derry, Northern Ireland. The fighting was between residents of the Bogside area (organised under the Derry Citizens' Defence Association), and the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) along with local unionists.

The Battle of the Bogside was a very large communal riot that took place during 12–14 August in Derry, Northern Ireland. The fighting was between residents of the Bogside area (allied under the Derry Citizens' Defence Association) and the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC).Location: Derry, Northern Ireland.

Battle of bogside
Rated 5/5 based on 72 review
Northern Ireland Troubles: Battle of the Bogside - lookbeyondthelook.com